DEPORTATION

This is the process or the act of formally and legally removing foreign nationals from a country and returning them to the country where they came from. Foreign nationals in the United States are usually deported once they violate the immigration law of the country.

To report someone you think may be in the USA illegally, use this online form or call 1-866-347-2423 (in the U.S., Mexico, or Canada) or 1-802-872-6199 (from other countries).

After the deportation process begins:

  • The U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) Immigration Court hears the related case.
  • If the judge declares a decision for the deportation to process, the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) carries out the judge’s order.

For questions, find a U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) office.

Appeal a Deportation Order

Certain deportation rulings can be appealed, but you have to seek legal advice before doing so. Non-profit organizations have means and ways to help you. If you have questions about an appeal, contact USCIS.

Apply for Readmission After Deportation

Aside from appealing, you can also apply for readmission after being deported. For more information about reapplication, contact USCIS.

LOCATE A PERSON HELD FOR AN IMMIGRATION VIOLATION

A person possibly detained for violation of immigration laws or was released with the last 60 days can be located by using Online Detainee Locator System or by contacting field offices of the Office of Enforcement and Removal Operations (ERO).

Call the immigration detention facility directly if you know which facility it is.

For more information on cases or detainees, contact the Immigration Court.

Persons detained in a federal prison for reasons no longer related to violation of immigration, you can use the prison locator of the Federal Bureau of Prisons.

AVOID DEPORTATION IF YOU WERE BROUGHT TO THE U.S. WHEN YOU WERE A CHILD

If you were still a child when you were brought in the U.S. and you are not legally a U.S. resident or an immigrant; actions of deportation against you by the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) can be delayed for two years.

This program called Consideration of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) will allow you to stay in the country and work but not apply for a citizenship.

Guidelines and procedures are available for for first-time applicants and those seeking a renewal. To help you qualify for your application, the UCIS answered frequently asked questions about the matter.

For applicants in a complicated process, the UCIS recommends legal assistance. For basic questions, contact a USCIS office directly.